Pete's Walks - Maidensgrove Common and Moor Common (page 1 of 6)

If you are considering walking this route yourself, please see my disclaimer. You may also like to see these notes about the maps.

Google map of the walk

I did this circular walk of about 14.3 miles on Saturday, 14th September 2017. It was a repeat of a walk I did in early July this year (2017) but done in the opposite (clockwise) direction. In this case I am using the term 'circular walk' even more loosely than usual, as the route was actually a long thin rectangle with the return section sometimes only a few hundred yards from the outward section.

I parked on Maidensgrove Common where the lane crosses it (grid reference SU 717886) - it's all named Russell's Water Common on the OS map, but I believe this south-eastern end is named Maidensgrove Common. I started walking just after 10am, following the lane into Maidensgrove (so I had the smaller part of the common on my right). Where a lane came in on the right, I turned left along a drive and almost immediately passed a pond on the left. At the end of the drive a short path continued straight on into Pishillbury Wood, soon meeting a bridleway where I turned left. After a short distance the bridleway appeared to fork either side of a tree, but the right fork was actually a footpath going right, which was the way I wanted to go today (this and the previous path junction are just shown as a 'crossroads' on the OS map). The path ran for several hundred yards through Pishillbury Wood - the first section had obviously been used as a track for recent forestry work, and I had to keep an eye out for white arrows to check that I stayed on the footpath when the track diverged from it. The path eventually dropped downhill between old hedgerows to reach a minor road, where I turned right into Stonor.

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The lane through Maidensgrove Common, heading into Maidensgrove

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The drive in Maidensgrove

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The path through Pishillbury Wood

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The path through Pishillbury Wood

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The path through Pishillbury Wood

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The path through Pishillbury Wood

I followed the road to just past the entrance to Stonor Park, when I took a path on the left that went through a metal gate into the deer park. I'd forgotten how steep the first part of this path was, but that was soon over and then it was a long and very gradual uphill through the deer park, with Stonor House and its ancient chapel down to my left. The scenery was very pleasant here, but I had to turn round to get the best views. Eventually I reached the tall (and narrow, it's a very tight squeeze with a rucksack on your back) metal gate in the fence in the deer park. Just past this I spotted some fungi, which I later had identified as Trooping Funnel toadstools (also known as Monk's Head toadstoold, the scientific name is Clitocype geotropa). The path then continued gently uphill through woods for a third of a mile to reach a lane at Southend (a hamlet at the southern end of the parish of Turville).

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The road through Stonor

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The steep start to the path through Stonor deer park

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The path through Stonor deer park

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View towards Pishill

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Stonor House

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The path through Stonor deer park

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The path through Stonor deer park

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Trooping Funnel (or Monk's Head) toadstool

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The path continuing through the woods towards Southend

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The path continuing through the woods towards Southend

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The path continuing through the woods towards Southend